Global Arbitration Review Covers New CPR Rules and Staff Promotions

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CPR Appoints New VP and Takes Rules on the Road
Richard Woolley
12 March 2015

The International Institute of Conflict Prevention and Resolution has named Olivier André as its new vice president of dispute resolution services ahead of a series of international events to promote the institution’s new administered arbitration rules.

A dual US-French citizen admitted in New York and Massachusetts, André began his career in Paris  – at the ICC International Court of Arbitration and in the arbitration practice of Shearman & Sterling – before joining CPR as a special counsel, director of dispute resolution services and head of the centre’s Young Attorneys in Dispute Resolution programme in 2010.

In his new role, André takes responsibility for the case management of CPR’s international arbitration proceedings as well as raising the institution’s profile in its targeted growth-markets – Europe, Asia and Brazil.

Part of this process will be a series of international events to celebrate CPR’s newly-adopted rules on administered arbitration, beginning with a panel discussion in Miami today, followed by one-day conferences in Geneva, London and Madrid.

The rules, which came into effect in December 2014, were drafted by CPR’s arbitration committee, chaired by Simpson Thacher & Bartlett’s Robert Smit and White & Case’s Ank Santens, to “explicitly address the three main criticisms of international arbitration, regarding time, cost and complexity of proceedings.”

The rules require the centre to approve any scheduling orders or extensions that would cause an award to be rendered more than a year after the formation of the panel, and cap administrative fees at US$34,000.

They also mandate a pre-hearing conference between the parties and offer them flexibility to oversee disclosure, and provide tribunals with sets of guidelines aimed at “streamlining an otherwise complex arbitration.”

The rules also offer parties the use of a “screened” appointment procedure for arbitrators, whereby arbitrators are appointed without knowing which party selected them.

“In the past decade, we’ve seen a surge in cross-border dispute activity but the absence of a clear set of rules that instil confidence in the international arbitration process and alleviate the perceived risks associated with pursuing arbitration,” says Noah Hanft, who became president and CEO at the centre last year.

André, who was a member of the drafting committee, will speak at the Geneva, London and Madrid events, held at the offices of Lalive, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and Bird & Bird respectively.

As well as promoting André, CPR has named Terri Bartlett as its new vice president of member services, and Mara Weinstein as director of dispute resolution services and training and education. Bartlett previously served as director of membership at CPR, while Weinstein was a special counsel and panels manager.

Hanft says he is delighted with the “well-deserved promotions of Olivier, Terri and Mara,” while Shearman’s head of international arbitration Emmanuel Gaillard adds: “I am very happy to hear about Olivier’s promotion to vice-president at CPR.”